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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
is the same as in other large cities -- investors discover a derelict district not far from the city and renovate it. then they raise the prices. >> the financial crisis has made it worse. people invest in property. real-estate prices have never gone down here, so it has always been a good investment. >> the center gave in to appeals for cheaper housing and entered into an alliance for living. 6000 flats are to be built. 1/3 is low-income housing. with the population growing by 12,000 people a year, will that be enough? >> it should be enough because we will not stop building. it is not a four-year manifesto. it is for the whole time. >> all this comes too late for this woman who spends her entire income of 400 euros on rent, but she is still happy to have a room after so much searching. the time of uncertainty is over. >> i packed a bag, left my things at friends and acquaintances, and had to look for a sofa or bed to sleep on every night. i did not have a permanent place to sleep. i had to move from sofa to sofa >> many students and trainees have to commute. they stay with their pa
developed regulations. i heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk about what he had learned as a mayor. he had been a central government official before and he realized once you got there, a central government officials do not understand a lives of ordinary people. and then he had to watch the proceedings and the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice. that was one of the first times in 35 or 40 years of going to china that i heard a chinese talk about procedural justice. the term is in the vocabulary. i think local experimentation may have the least helped in the increment the building of the change of legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of one of the american federal systems. the laboratories of the experiment. one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion, it is a large population. one virtue is that you can divided into provinces and you can have real experiments. try this over here and try that over there. that is a tremendous virtue. i read in your book, you h
a largely black city, you saw folks going out to the suburbs. dollars going with them. that's the struggle. >> it's a struggle, but is the message at the end of your film hopeful or depressing? >> well, it's realistic. we're not saying that detroit is over, it can't rise again. we're saying please double down on detroit. please focus on a lot of us our cities going bankrupt and infrastructural problems in detroit. it's not a message of it's all going to be fine but if people ban together and we focus on places like detroit, of course, there's hope. >> you talk to so many people that are struggling. what did they say they want to get done and how do they expect it to get done? >> they want basic -- i think they want a basic quality of life. they really do. at this point it's donning on them that it's never going to be the way it used to be but they want to have a basic life and that their kids will have at least as good a life as they have. >> what we're seeing in greece is what's happening in detroit. austerity cuts. >> we're seeing a big bailout -- >> right. >> starting with the auto indu
show these underwater creatures draw large crowds, drive more than $300 million to the city and state and help maintain over 3300 jobs. >> it helps us to understand really the impact that we're making in the community. >> reporter: the aquarium commission report comes just as the nonprofit receives a grant from the state to help renovate its rate trade exhibit. >> the 2.5 million dollars that the state made available to us, to help support that project is very, very important. to us, remaining vital and relevant. really providing new things for our visitors. >> the report also shows that after people who come to the national aquarium annually. >> what does that mean for marylanders? how do they benefit? >> because people are coming from out of town, money that they earn elsewhere that they're spending here. so everyone from maryland benefits from that. >> reporter: translation, out- of-towners spend money funneled right back here to our city. our very own backyard. >> and because there have been so many out-of-towners visiting the aquarium
government figures, among the authority figures, and among society at large. >> afghan war victims have filed a class action suit against germany in a court in the western city of bonn. >> those claims are related to an air strike ordered by a german officer in northern afghanistan in 2009, which killed 90 civilians. germany had given some compensation to the victims' families without admitting responsibility. >> lawyers representing survivors of the air strike are demanding higher compensation -- more than 3 million euros in total. they complain the settlements arrived at immediately following the attack were too small. as far as the german government is concerned, the case is closed. >> 5000 u.s. dollars was paid in over 90 instances. this money was transferred to an account in afghanistan. the account was specifically designed to compensate these families. >> on september 4, 2009, a u.s. f-15 fighter jets bombed two fuel tankers, killing more than 90 civilians. a german officer called in the air strike based on faulty intelligence. the political repercussions were extensive. the german def
the next two years, large sections of kansas city on both the kansas and missouri sides will be wired. >> this is exactly what you guys wanted. >> exactly. that's exactly it. we want local entrepreneurs to take advantage of the faster seed that google fiber will bring and develop. you know, the sky is the limit. >> and how high is that? even the tech wizards aren't sure. >> you know, we've been asked that question a few times. the truthful answer is we don't know yet. now we have a new technology that no one else has in the nation, and it can take our business to a new height that we didn't even dream of. >> the practical effects are easier to predict. better property values, more reasons for investment, for top talent to come, stay. how much impact can all of this have on your city? >> i think at the end of the day, if you ask any mayor growing that small business, finding an aunt ru pentrepreneu to take a risk and do that in your community is going to grow jobs and grow the economy. >> for now, dreams are driving wild on the silicon prairie. tom foreman, cnn, kansas city, kansas. >>
joins us in new york city. so what is going on here, jamie? >> reporter: there are large concerns and it is pretty serious why we're talking about it again. martha, it has been already five days and there is no sign of this 11-year-old cancer patient known only as emily but authorities haven't given up hope. they have actually expanded their search and making clear that time is not on their side. take a look at this. this is a snippet of surveillance video they're working with, showing emily inside the phoenix children's hospital where she has been treated for lukemia a day before her scheduled discharge. you see her without a wig and iv pole. her mom puts her in different clothes and disguise that allowed her to go undedected outside the hospital as police are describes an as black van. a alert nurse quickly contacted 911. the catheter in emily's heart, doctors say, if it becomes infected could have deadly consequences. the little girl had one arm amputated from a previous infection. >> i can tell you we have searched for these, location of these individuals, both locally and out
quiet they were largely unskilled and there were no opportunities in the south and went into another plantation. there were no villages and towns and cities in the north. in the north people could free slaves with opportunities in manufacturing where they could learn skills and trades. couldn't do that in the south. the only opportunity for work or for field hands and when the cotton gin was invented, and that absorbed all the slaves unskilled laborer and you now have i plantation owner, this rather cruel lower middle income people buying property in planting cotton prior to that, most of the poor whites in the south were against slavery because the slaves competed with them for jobs. but unlike most politicians come he put his political career on the line in favor of abolition. >> he was the first to stand up and he led the fight turned his congressional career, which really began after his presidency. he failed to be really did to the presidency. you brought this up before because he didn't have the common touch. he believed it was the need for dignity of a presidential candidate t
largely unskilled and there were no opportunities in the south. the word out of one plantation began to another plantation. there were villages and towns and cities in the north come in and in the north people could read the slaves. there were opportunities in manufacturing where they could learn skills and serve as apprentices and learn skills and trades. couldn't do that in the south. the only opportunity for work was field hands, and then when it caught him chain was invented -- cotton shane was invented, you now have a sort of patrician of plantation owners. middle and lower-income people buying property and planting cotton. prior to that, most of the poor whites in the south were against slavery because the slaves compete for jobs. >> unlike most politicians he put his political career on the line in favor of abolition. he was the first to stand up for emancipation and he led the fight throughout his congressional career which began after his presidency. he failed to be reelected and the presidency because he didn't have the common touch. he believed that there was beneath the d
in an effort to restore balance. we are expecting large protests here today outside the palace here in cairo. in the city of alexandria, there have been more violent clashes between president morsei's opponents and his supporters. the president's opponents are demanding that he immediately gives up all of the sweeping new powers that he gave himself two weeks ago. they also want him to postpone a referendum on egypt's new constitution, due to take place in just over a week. critics say that constitution doesn't protect the rights of all egyptians. but president morsi didn't do either of those things last night. instead he offered to give up just one of his new powers, vaguely worded right to take all necessary measures to affect the country. he said he would give up the other powers once the referendum had taken place. also yesterday, president obama telephoned president morsi to express his deep concern over the violence and deaths that have occurred. he also urged president morsi to have a dialogue with the opposition without any preconditions. for "cbs this morning," holly williams, cairo
itself up in cities and on the coasts. it brought me back to square one and keeping my curiosity on the systems and not just the internet, but power and aviation and the large complicated things that we depend on so much. >> "tubes" is the name of the book. andrew blum is the author. this is "communicators" on c- span. >> sometimes he was a cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. many of his age and class, they're not going to apologize to a young and private secretary. he had a way of turning the tables. his version of an apology would be to say, well, i am a kind man and you are doing a good job today. but the issue was never settled. he always had to get the
seen a dramatic drop in litter 0 around the city. san jose officials say their next goal is to eliminate polystyrene foam. they plan to present the city warmest to the city council in february to phase out foam boxes for large established starting in 2014 and small restaurants in 2015. >> the specific gun club may not be evicted after all the board of supervisors are expected to vote on the matter tomorrow. the city voted to of the to the club back in july after the estimated soil cleanup costs of the site would be $10.5 million. but during the eviction process, the club reached a deal for a month- to-month lease with the city. the gun club has been at this location for nearly 80 years. >> members of nasa's curiosity team are expected to give an update of its mission to mars today at noon. --the announcement will be delivered here in san francisco at the annual fall meeting of the american geophysical union. rumors about a big discovery began after curiosity's sciences was quoted as saying that a rover instrument responsible for finding inorganic compounds had gathered da
. >> the carnage and the city left in their wake. activists say that dozens of people were killed when at least one rocket hit this mosque. they say that most of the .asualties were civilians > >> there is a large number of dead and injured. for now, so many civilians are trying to run away. >> more than 500,000 palestinian refugees in syria live here. but the cast also include members of the liberation of the palestinian general command. their leader is said to leave anti-chairman forces. is the first time it was hit. the president's forces have been fighting for weeks. activists say that the air strike on the campus the sixth such attack in the area. the videos show the damage caused by continuous artillery and rocket chilling in this city. many residential buildings were destroyed. shellings in thisng'rocket city. many residential buildings were destroyed. many of the dead included women and children. sunday's attack came as rebels fought to gain ground in and near damascus and beyond. >> at least six people have been killed in a series of bomb blast in northern iraq. at least 25 more were wound
on to customers. >> here in the u.s., we've seen circuit city, the electronics store, borders, the bookstore go out of business. largely because of competition with amazon. >> reporter: based in seattle, amazon was started in the mid'90s to sell books online. and for years made no profit. but it soon became clear that founder jeff bezos and his notoriously secret company had bigger plans. they started expanding in the late 1990s into videos, music, games, electronics, kitchenware, clothing, shoes, jewelry. business services, information storage. amazon turned the corner to profitability in 2002 and today, amazon is a $100 billion global company. and though bezos declined our request for an interview, he recently told "fortune" magazine's andy serwer -- >> our goal is to become the most customer obsessed company. is there someone doing some element better than we? how do we improve? >> online shopping is still only 10% of total retail. >> reporter: meaning amazon in all likelihood is just getting started. ben stein told me recently he has never seen a company dominate a market quite the way amaz
to you on the highway. >>> one of the bay area's largest countes is sending large shopping bags to pasture as the new year begins on tuesday and applies to alameda counties and all of the cities. they will note longer be able to give customers one-time use plastic bags. instead, pay a dime for each recyclable paper bag used and similar laws are already in affect in san jose, san francisco and dozens of other california cities and counties. and since its ban took affect, the number of plastic bags littering city streets went down 59%. >> who counsels that stuff? >> i don't know. >>> 58%. 50million experience. >>> some local transis a -- transit agencies are offering free rides for those people wanting free rides tomorrow night. >> and? san francisco, fireworks will go off along the embarcadero. and they have free rides at 11:00 p.m. with later service only for southbound trains and muni will offer free rides with some lines running later than usual and for partiers in sill cop valley, all vta light bus and light rail is free between 7:00 p.m. and 4:00 a.m. and there will be exte
for several minutes. now, a coastal city did report a three-foot high tsunami. but no large waves. there have been several aftershocks. a couple of 5.0 tremors as well. >>> a man suffered serious injuries after surning around 30 feet after the oakland raider game. christien kafton is live at the coliseum and has been getting reaction from fans and has new information. >> reporter: we have new information, whether this individual fell or jumped. right now, oakland police are treating this as an accidental fall. let's show you the seen. we do know that that fan fell from -- we do know the fan fell from the third level of that concourse down to the lower level here. we've also learned the fall was on the outside of the stadium. so you are looking at the exact areaor the exact type of fall that individual would have taken. that's somewhere between 30 to 50 feet. oakland police told me that they estimated -- estimated that fall between 0 feet. he fell during the -- during the raiders and broncos' game. there were some conflicting reports over this, whether this individual jumped or fell. that inci
that we are working on it and the center-sent me an e- mail--centimeter and evil and th city center supervisor city supervisors, ciy workers and setting out in else. >> reporter: thank you. >> catherine: also a large tree branches that fell onto a san francisco gas stationit happened on portrero and 17th streets over the weekend. the awning of the 76 station was knocked over. no one was hurt. we have some weather photos sent in by viewers. elaine eng sent us this photo showing flooding on 280 this morning near the foothill exit. and jonathan miranda send this photo showing storm damage at a san francisco gas station a tree branch came crashing storm if you have pictures you want to share with us, send them to breaking-news-at- kron-four.com. stay with kron-4 as we continue to track the wet weather and storm damage. for the latest updates - check out our website - kron4.com, and our facebook and twitter pages. >> catherine: in other bay area news. 15 homes in mill valley are still without water tonight. that's after a water main broke, flooding marin avenue. kron 4's reggie kumar tel
in the city of budapest. the attack on hon. jews happen later in the war. effectively, -- the attack on hungarian jews happen later in the war. a large community survive in budapest, a couple hundred thousand, which is a significant number. in poland they survive in all kinds of ways. many survive are going to the soviet union. many came home to find what was left. one very sad and moving archival document said many come home just to see the cemeteries and then leave because they do not want to be there anymore. jews to come back. some try to make new lives there. some joined the communist party. the communist party has an attraction not just for jews, but for anybody who experience the devastation of the war and the shattering of morality the war brought. many people did see in communism a kind of alternatives. maybe this system will work. liberal democracy did not work. the west did not come to our aid. maybe there is some alternative. there was a brief time when people were listening to the radio station, and it was attractive for jews who had nothing else that were excluded from
' promotional film foretold everything from nuclear power plants that would light up cities to new and improved means of transportation. >> while nuclear power in locomotives, submarines, ships and even very large airplanes may all but revolutionize future transportation on land, sea and air. >> osgood: on december 2, 1957, 15 years to the day after that chain reaction in chicago, americans first commercial nuclear power plant opened in shippingport pennen. >> this plant has a secure place in american history. it is the first of the world's large-scale nuclear power stations exclusively devoted to peaceful purposes. >> osgood: today with just over 100 plants across the united states producing roughly 20% of our electricity, the nuclear industry's future stands at a cross roads. >> evacuation. please stay indoors with your windows closed. >> reporter: opponents of new plant construction point to the leak at pennsylvania's three mile island in 1979, to the soviet reactor meltdown in chernobyl in 1986 and to the fukushima disaster in japan after last year's earthquake and tsunami. supporters count
on the street. that's the sense in which the city's tribune, he's a alone centrist. >> karl marx said dickens issued to the world more social and political truth that had been uttered. >> but it's also the case that dickens' political vision was largely thought of in his lifetime by serious political thinkers as mickey mouse. there was a kind of profound naive tee about his way of thinking about ordering power within society. most of us we inherit from orwell's famous essay on dickens in which he said the whole problem with oliver twist is no system saved oliver twist. mr. brownwell saved him. >> dickens' whole point is that it's at the hands of systems that the poor were suffering. he was a kind of anti-ideologue. he perceived that some of the things that were being done to cure poverty, the statist moves were one o things the poor were suffering from. one of the reasons. >> it's not a criticism of a political novel to say that it doesn't offer a cure. it's not really the function of literature necessarily. what he does is to see it and show it. >> charlie: observe, expose and sometimes expl
as a replacement. >>> they ignored warnings that a large hurricane could hit the big apple. a 2,006 report said it was a question of time before hurricane came and flooded the system and caused wide outages in new york city. those warnings went unheeded due to concerns about budget cuts and the likelihood of such a storm. hurricane sandy is the second costliest disaster in u.s. history. >>> they had the first hack-a-thon. they worked on ideas yesterday afternoon. the goal was to create fun and practical apps using public information available through county records. >> we have seen interesting ideas around restaurant inspections. and we have seen ideas around places like parks. parks and rec information was interesting to people. >>> the grand prize winners made an app called book it and they took home a $3,000 prize. >>> there appears to and growing backlash against the new logo for the university of california system. more than 25,000 people have signed an on line petition at change.org to review the new design which made its debut friday. some say it is undignified. the new design is not rep
. jordanian officials say it was first coordinated bombings at large shopping malls in ayman. almost simultaneously, machine gun and bomb attacks on cafe and hotels frequented by diplomats and tourists. with the city's police responding to those attacks, jordanian officials say the terrorists plan to launch the main assault on the u.s. embassy in amman. it's one of america's biggest embassies in the world. tom sanderson says the motivation for the attack was to show p capability. >> to inflict damage on the united states, inflict damage, physical and reputational, on the jordanian government in an environment in which all other governments are certainly dealing with their own difficulties right now. >> reporter: all 11 suspects were rounded up by jordanian security forces in mid october. jordanian officials say they'd planned to strike on november 9th, the seventh anniversary of the last al qaeda attack in jordan. when suicide bombers struck three hotels in amman, killing about 60 people. the man who claimed responsible for that attack was al zarqawi who led the group al qaeda in ira
areas, that he's surrounded by a large contingent of loyal fighters. but that narrative is pre- 9/11 understanding of ubl. the second narrative, he's living in the city, living in a city with multiple points of egress and entry, access to communications, so that he can keep in touch with the organization. you can't run a global network of interconnected cells from a cave. >> that was a clip of the new movie called "zero dark thirty," chronicles this mission highlighting many of the people in the takedown including this young woman in seeking, finding, killing osama bin laden. in this new report from "the washington post," this mystery cia operative has a very complicated life, even more so after the bin laden raid. joining me from washington is greg miller, the intelligence reporter with the post, with "the washington post." welcome. >> thanks. >> what an article. i read it and from what i can tell, and also listen to an interview with catherine bigelow. this cia operative found the link to the courier to drive this forward to find osama bin laden. who is she? what do you know? >>
not bomb from the air civilian targets and they didn't by and large. the liftoff had always said announcements and penalties for people who violated the strict instructions not to cause civilian damage until about a year into the war then made a navigation error, struck the city of london, the docks of london. churchill says, i'll show you how that works. the bomb our civilian targets, obama berlin. he bones milan. ... one, berlin is 100 on london. perot loses the war, but he destroys london's -- london from the air. and, of course, the british and the americans who had this was a war crime remembered that deal. by the end of the war, no one had the nerve to bring charges that nuremberg for the war crime of civilian bombing from the air . that tells us, i think, how even if we had in agreement with the other side of of cyber war have those laws would actually play out. we would not be able to contain a cyber war anymore than we could contain bombing from the air, which means that essentially we are engaged in a fool's errand to try and get legal norms on cyber war. it is not goin
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)